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File and Settings Menus


Living With Google Chrome

So, where do you go about finding the file and settings menus? While a program like Firefox has these things set up under a number of different drop-down menus near the top of the screen, Google Chrome has collapsed them all into two smaller drop-down menus instead. The first is the file menu, which is located immediately to the right of the address bar. This is where you can open a new tab, copy and paste, print, report a bug, and so on. Personally, I use keyboard shortcuts more than anything, so this menu isn't used very much.

Living With Google Chrome

The other menu, to the right of the file menu and represented by a wrench, is the settings menu. This is used for seeing your history, clearing browsing data, and accessing the options. Strangely, "exit" is located here and not under the file menu where it is normally found.

Bookmarks and Searching

Living With Google Chrome

Although there are very few toolbars in Google Chrome, the developers did choose to include a bookmarks toolbar. This is placed directly below the address bar and you can place "other bookmarks" in a folder off to the right side.

Strangely, if you weren't specifically instructed, you may not be able to know how to add a bookmark. It's under neither the file nor the settings menu. How the heck are supposed to add a favorite? While you can use the tried and true CTRL+D keyboard command, you'd still want a mouse-based command as well, right? It turns out that the way you add a bookmark is by clicking on the "star" immediately to the left of the address bar. Handy, but not immediately obvious.

You may also notice that there is no separate Google search bar. That's because Google Search has been integrated into the address bar. If you need to search something, you type it in there, just as you would a URL. It will automatically suggest both search terms and URLs based on what you enter. If something is reasonably obvious, Chrome will immediately direct you to the correct site instead of sending you through the search results page first.

Living With Google Chrome

And yes, all of those handy Google tricks still work, like using Google to do simple arithmetic and currency conversions. Unfortunately, there does not appear to be any support for additional search tools, like those used to searching with Wikipedia, Amazon, and IMDB. I really liked that about the Google bar in Firefox.


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