Futurelooks Evaluates RAID 0 Performance With Two Kingston HyperX 120GB SATA3 SF-2281 SSDs

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The Kingston HyperX 120GB/240GB SSD is the current champion SATA3 SSD that earned our esteemed Editor’s Choice in our recent Round Up of SATA3 Sandforce Controller SSDs. Not only does it perform quite well in any basic configuration, but it also features the most extensive consumer friendly accessory bundle offered by anyone. The “Upgrade Kit” is intended to help you transform your current or new computer in to a high performance speed demon by providing you everything you need in the box. Check out the unboxing video above (or directly on YouTube) to see what you get. Then we’ll show you some performance numbers.

Shacking Up With a Pair of HyperX SSDs

In our SATA3 SSD round up, we showed you how just one of the sweet looking Kingston HyperX 120GB SSDs produced some impressive data transfer numbers that will more than satisfy the largest majority of users. However, some pro-users move a lot of data and multitask. Another SSD could help if configured in RAID. We took two HyperX 120GB SSDs and attached them in a RAID 0 configuration using a GIGABYTE GA-Z68XP-UD5 motherboard via the native Intel SATA3 ports. Here’s what we found out.

Kingston HyperX 120GB Single vs RAID 0 CrystalDiskMark 500x239 Futurelooks Evaluates RAID 0 Performance With Two Kingston HyperX 120GB SATA3 SF 2281 SSDs

First, we wanted to see how the HyperX 120GB SSD handles the intense data compression that CrystalDiskMark uses to benchmark storage devices. The 4K and 4K QD32 small data block write performance is simply awesome. This means your system will be able to manage and create content far more efficiently than a standard four hard drive array. Let’s look at one more.

Kingston HyperX 120GB Single vs RAID 0 ATTO 500x327 Futurelooks Evaluates RAID 0 Performance With Two Kingston HyperX 120GB SATA3 SF 2281 SSDs

ATTO is a good benchmark tool for measuring storage device Input/Output Per Second operations. The higher the scores, the more corresponding block data the devices are capable of moving in a given second. As you can see, the HyperX 120GB SSDs in RAID0 read score is as high as 1,104 MB/s and write score as high as 970 MB/s. Again, the smaller 4K data block performance is as impressive as ever where much of the real world performance benefits.

Conclusion

The numbers say it all. We love that the Kingston HyperX 120GB SSD offers impressive, stable single and RAID0 performance especially with the recent firmware updates that gave the SandForce SF-2281 controller a shot in the butt. The update is available to anyone with a HyperX SSD.

If one or more of the SSDs are in your future, you’ll find the retail kit bundled with a USB enclosure, Acronis system cloning software and Kingston’s great customer service and 24/7 support. If you need your speed fix immediately, like maybe in the parking lot of the store, then this kit is worth every penny for the pleasure. But for those of you that already have the bundle as your first drive, Kingston also sells a drive only package to save you a few dollars too.

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About

As our Senior PC Hardware Editor, Eric has been working with tech since before serving in the military where he really got to play with some very cool hardware. As for his prowess on the virtual battlefield, don't let the teddy bear exterior fool you. He can frag and pwn with the best in just about any first person shooter. You may run in to him at LANs, tech shows, and gaming shows, so do say hello.

  • JAMF

    Could be improved by testing a 240GB version against these two 120GB in RAID0.

    The (slightly) better performance (compared to 120GB) and about equal price would give a better impression of apples vs apples comparison.

  • Ericgaray

    You might want to check your sources or data. The performance will be very close between a 240GB and 120GB in a single configuration. At the time of launch, the pricing was quite a bit higher. Even now, the cost of the 240GB (when available) is right at twice the cost. And, of course, the 240GB can’t compete against 2 x 120GB RAID0. And, while we do occasionally flex the virtual “e-peen” for the readers, this was the more cost effective route. – I do agree it would have been nice to include a 240GB benchmark but there were extremely few available at the time.

    • Ericgaray

      “The performance will be very close between a 240GB and 120GB in a single configuration” – I should have specified in ATTO mainly and in the actual 4K data block total. Sequential would be noticeably higher but that doesn’t benefit your computer’s overall performance nearly as much as the 4K block action. :)

    • Ericgaray

      “The performance will be very close between a 240GB and 120GB in a single configuration” – I should have specified in ATTO mainly and in the actual 4K data block total. Sequential would be noticeably higher but that doesn’t benefit your computer’s overall performance nearly as much as the 4K block action. :)

  • Floppyone

    English lesson(We invented it, you ruined it): It is not “one fourty four ninety nine” it’s “one hundred and fourty four ninety nine”. Data is “day-ta” not “dahta”.

    You do not have to tell everybody what they can use various components for, you can assume that having searched for this, we already know that we don’t have to use that drive in that enclosure and so on…

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