When you live on the cutting edge with a limitless budget, it goes without saying that your rig should be able to handle just about anything that the tech world may throw at it. Asking whether or not your PC can run Crysis is becoming less relevant, because a lot of machines can. It's not just the high-end ones and this trickle-down effect holds up across all sorts of other usage scenarios too.

It really wasn't all that long ago that you needed a fairly decent PC in order to properly edit some full HD video. These days, every amateur YouTuber is doing 1080p without too much trouble. Indeed, live video streaming through smartphones is becoming increasingly mainstream and your phone is hardly a "real" PC. With approximately 10 million users, Periscope sees some 350,000 hours of video streamed every day.

And as great as platforms like Periscope, Snapchat and Meerkat have become with their social aspects, they are still insufficient for a number of other possible applications. The world of business and corporate communications needs more out of its video webcasting than what Periscope can offer. It needs moderation. It needs scalability. It needs improved interactivity.

What it doesn't need, surprisingly enough, is incredible high-end hardware to get the job done. With solutions like Blue Jeans Primetime, hosting live online events with full video webcasting is more accessible than ever. Even if you were to consider hosting something the scale of the massive press conferences at CES, you could do it. Moderators can "see" as attendees raise their virtual hands, all while the presenters can keep doing their thing.

But how much hardware do you really need for a decent video webcasting experience? Four key factors come into play here, all of which are easily within reach for individuals or organizations with even modest budgets. You could try to make do with less than what is listed here, but these specs can be understood as a recommended benchmark for a good webcast.

First, you'll want a quad core CPU. On the Intel side, this could be a middle of the road Core i5.

To back this up, you'll want at least 4GB of RAM and a dedicated graphics card with at least 512MB of VRAM, if not 1GB. Video performance is key.

The final piece, and one that simply cannot be understated, is your Internet connection. Wireless can work in a pinch, but to avoid issues with latency and interference, a wired connection is preferred. You'll also want a consistent minimum upload speed of about 1.5Mbps to handle HD video.

If you've been able to stream your gaming sessions through Steam and Twitch, you should be able to handle more business-oriented video webcasting without a hitch. It's professional, it's clean, and it's more accessible than ever. Your clients, colleagues and partners will be thoroughly impressed, regardless of the platform that they use in their own offices.


Online video is good. Live video over the web with a full toolbox of features is even better.

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