As a freelance writer and self-described professional gadget geek, I rely on the Internet for my livelihood. If it were not for the Internet, I would not be able to do what I do for a living. I imagine this is true for many businesses all around the world, so having reliable Internet access is positively essential. And it needs to be fast. I'd hate to fathom what it'd be like to work on a slow dial-up connection, since broadband Internet is pretty well the de facto standard.


Given all of this, choosing the right Internet service provider is a crucial decision for any business. You want speed, performance and reliability, but you also want to be reasonably cost effective too. One question that some business owners may ask is whether they should choose ADSL or broadband for their business Internet. The thing is that this is really just a matter of semantics.

If you were to boil things down to their basics, broadband and ADSL are effectively the same thing. The terms are oftentimes used interchangeably, as they both refer to high speed Internet access. In the strictest sense, ADSL is delivered over a phone line, while broadband can include ADSL, as well as other connection technologies like cable. For most parts of the world, cost and performance would be comparable between the two.

According to a recent report by the Public Interest Advocacy Centre (PIAC), based out of Ottawa, Canadians are paying too much for their phone, Internet and television bills. Most Canadian households are spending between $100 and $212 a month. What I find a little curious is that the way Internet access is sold in Canada is different from some other parts of the world.

When you look at some major Internet providers in Canada, like Telus or Bell, you'll find that their business Internet plans are tiered based on the download and upload speeds they can provide. For the most basic of connections, getting speeds of up to about 10Mbps including a business phone line, you can expect a package to cost about $75. Prices go up from there.

Over in Australia, things can be a little different. If you were to look at the business Internet & broadband plans from iiNet, you'll find that you don't get packages based on speed; they're based on how much you download. If the iiNet's ADSL2+ technology is available in your area, you can expect to find speeds that exceed 20Mbps. The basic bundle includes 100GB of downloads at full speed before being shaped, but you still have unlimited access. And that still includes a business phone line and an upload speed booster to up to double your upload speeds. It's also important to note that uploads don't count against your high-speed cap.


In the consumer space, some have posited that the introduction of Netflix in Australia could have an impact on Internet pricing in the country too. That remains to be seen, but it should not have a direct impact on the delivery of business Internet down under, at least not in the short term. At the end of the day, regardless of geography, businesses all around the globe just want to have fast, reliable broadband Internet at an affordable price.

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